Scientific programme

EV06  E-POSTER VIEWING- MAY 9-12- EXHIBITION HOURS
LOW BACK AND SPINAL PAIN

09-May-2018 19:00 20:00
 
 
Abstract:
EFFICACY OF HIGH-FREQUENCY TRANSCUTANEOUS ELECTRICAL NERVE STIMULATION FOR CHRONIC LOW BACK PAIN: DOES HYPERSENSITIVITY MATTER?
Objectives:

Aim. This study investigated the efficacy of a fixed-site high-frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (hfTENS) device for persons with persistent chronic low back pain (CLBP).

Methods:

Methods. Sixty-eight subjects were randomized to either use the device daily (Experimental, N=35) or were monitored for 3 months as treatment-as-usual without the device (Control, N=33). All subjects completed baseline questionnaires, were administered a brief quantitative sensory test (QST) of pressure pain thresholds and mechanical temporal summation, and uploaded smartphone applications (apps) for daily pain assessment and for tracking device use. All subjects participated in telephone interviews once a week, were prompted to complete daily assessments on the pain app, and completed mailed questionnaires at 6 weeks and 3 months.

Results:

Results. The subjects averaged 46.2±2.7 years of age and 77.9% were Caucasian. The Experimental subjects used the device an average of 380.6±352.6 hours (range 24 to 1,459) over the course of the trial. Compared with the control subjects, those in the experimental condition demonstrated reduced pain intensity (p<0.01), reduced pain-related interference (p<0.05), and significant improvement in pain catastrophizing (p<0.05). No differences were found between groups on anxiety, depression, or pain disability. Those with greater sensitivity on QST demonstrated more disability and tended to use the hfTENS more (p<0.05), but sensitivity did not predict outcome.

Conclusions:

Conclusion. These results demonstrated that this hfTENS device was moderately helpful in reducing CLBP, but those with pretrial sensitivity based on QST results did not demonstrate increased benefit. This trial was supported in part by an investigational grant from Neurometrix, Inc.

 
Co-authors
R. Jamison 1, L. Wan 1, E. Ross 1, R. Edwards 1
1Brigham and Women's Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Anethesiology, Chestnut Hill, USA